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WG.Summer 2020

Light is the prerequisite of art. Without light no colors, shadows and shapes, and by extension no audience who can view the finished work. Light also enables the most fundamental processes of organic life through photosynthesis. The plants take their nourishment from the air, water and soil. The green color of the leaves contains chlorophyll. The chlorophyll absorbs light and converts carbon dioxide from the air and water into nutrients. This chemical process is called photosynthesis and is itself the prerequisite for all life on earth. 

Based on this theme, we at Wetterling Gallery have curated a summer show with artworks from our represted artstist. It can be viewed on site at the gallery's project room in Stockholm as well as in this expanded online viewing room. The exhibition runs during June, July and August and the gallery will be open Tuesday - Saturday, 12 - 5 pm. 

Green 1

Detail from Linda Bäckström's sculpture Dead Flowers, 2018 

THE COLOR GREEN 

In nature, chlorophyll is what gives plant life their green colors and people have been fascinated with it for centuries. On the visible spectrum, green sits between blue and yellow and in color theory, it is a secondary color made out of mixing its two neighbor colors.

Commonly, green is a color of the natural world, foremost springtime as well as a color of health, youth, life, hope and renewal. It is the color we best absorb with our eyes and is known for calming us. The backside of green is that it is also commonly used as a poisonous color describing envy, greed, jealousy, toxicity, and sickness. As good as it captures the wonders of nature around us it is also used to portrait fantasy worlds and mystical creatures.

Although some ancient Mesopotamian ceramic figures features costumes in vibrant green, it is a mystery to scientists as to how the original artists produced the colors because the first hues of green made by prehistoric men were made out of birch branches and the result was rather dull and brown instead of green.

Green 2

Karin Davie 
Pain Drain No 1, 2018 

It was not until the 19th century that synthetic green pigments and dyes came upon the scene. Before that, in 1775 the Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele invented a deadly hue, Scheele’s Green. It was a bright green pigment laced with toxic, chemical arsenic. As it was cheap to produce, the color became a sensation in the Victorian era although many suspected that it could be dangerous. It was featured in Napoleon Bonaparte’s bedroom wallpaper and it is believed that the pigment caused the revolutionary’s death in 1821. By the end of the 19th century a similar mixture of copper and arsenic called Paris Green was launched. Unfortunately, this green was also quite poisonous and may have been responsible for Cezanne’s diabetes and Monet’s blindness. In the 1960’s it was fortunately banned, and now green shades are made in a completely safe way.

Landscapes 1

Ylva Ceder
Ängd, 2019

LANDSCAPE PAINTING

The appreciation of nature for its own sake, and its choice as a specific subject for art, trace back to the 4th century in China. However, in Western art it is a relatively recent phenomenon. Although elements of landscapes often appear in paintings produced by various cultures, before the 17th century, they were only peripheral as background of portraits and paintings dealing principally with religious, mythological, and historical subjects.

During the 17th century, the French Academy classified the genres of art and placed landscape fourth in order of importance out of five genres and many artists began portraying landscapes. French artists draw inspiration from history and tried to evoke classical Greek and roman environments, known as classical landscapes, whereas Dutch artists developed a more naturalistic form, based on what they saw around them.

 

Landscapes 2

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Die Neue Ordnung der Zeit/ The New Order of Time, 2019 

During the 18th century, landscape painting became increasingly popular, although the classical idea predominated, and it was not until the 19th century that the naturalistic landscape painting exploded in popularity. It seems artists were then driven by the notion that nature is a direct manifestation of God and thus tried to caption this, such as the British artists J.M.W. Turner is known for. After this, it was France turn again, where impressionists such as Claude Monet created such creative works that it became a revolution of what we today call modern art and the earlier mentioned hierarchical genres collapsed.

In the second half of the 20th century, the definition of landscapes expanded and included urban and industrial landscapes and artists began to use less traditional media and techniques to create landscape works. Today, landscape continue to be a major theme in art, where all kinds of medium, such as photography, video, and performance, explore the way we portrait our surroundings.

WG.Summer 2020

Photosynthesis

Slide-Show Thumbnails
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Motherland, 2016

Digital Print On Folex Fine Art Paper Contour

85 x 87,5 cm

Edition of 50 

SEK 14,500

Inquire
Dina Isæus-Berlin

Dina Isæus-Berlin
Untitled, 2018
Oil on MDF 
62.5 x 57 cm 
SEK 25,000

Inquire
Mike & Doug Starn

Mike and Doug Starn 
Blot Out The Sun #1, 1998 - 09
Epson K3 Ultrachrome Inkjet Prints On Thai Mulberry And Tissue Papers With Encaustic And Wax, Wood Frame
122 x 198 cm
$ 75,000 ex VAT 

Inquire
Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen 
Disappearing Into The Past #108, 2010 - 2012
Archival Fibre Print 
120 x 123 cm 
Edition of 5 
€ 6,400

Inquire
Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Leaves V, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

48 x 36 cm

€ 3,400

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Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Leaves VII, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

48 x 36 cm

€ 3,400

Inquire
Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Plant III, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

66.5 x 50 cm

€ 4,500 

Inquire
Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Film Edge (Mauve Sky, Yellow Horizon), 2011

Mixed Media Oil On Canvas

28 x 28 Inches

$ 30,000

Inquire
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Life, 2005

C-type Print Mounted On Glass

120 x 120 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 140,000

Inquire
Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman 
Sunflower VI, 2017 
Oil on Aluminum 
240 x 170 cm 
€ 13 000 

Inquire
Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Disappering Into the Past #35, 2010 - 2012

Archival Fiber Print

50 x 51 cm

Edition of 100

SEK 6,000

Inquire
Love Lundell

Love Lundell 

Plan Escape, 2016

Acrylic and collage on MDF

120 x 161.8 cm

SEK 55,000

Inquire
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Motherland, 2016

Digital Print On Folex Fine Art Paper Contour

85 x 87,5 cm

Edition of 50 

SEK 14,500

Dina Isæus-Berlin

Dina Isæus-Berlin
Untitled, 2018
Oil on MDF 
62.5 x 57 cm 
SEK 25,000

Mike & Doug Starn

Mike and Doug Starn 
Blot Out The Sun #1, 1998 - 09
Epson K3 Ultrachrome Inkjet Prints On Thai Mulberry And Tissue Papers With Encaustic And Wax, Wood Frame
122 x 198 cm
$ 75,000 ex VAT 

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen 
Disappearing Into The Past #108, 2010 - 2012
Archival Fibre Print 
120 x 123 cm 
Edition of 5 
€ 6,400

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Leaves V, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

48 x 36 cm

€ 3,400

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Leaves VII, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

48 x 36 cm

€ 3,400

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Plant III, 2019

Oil on Aluminium

66.5 x 50 cm

€ 4,500 

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Film Edge (Mauve Sky, Yellow Horizon), 2011

Mixed Media Oil On Canvas

28 x 28 Inches

$ 30,000

Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Life, 2005

C-type Print Mounted On Glass

120 x 120 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 140,000

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman 
Sunflower VI, 2017 
Oil on Aluminum 
240 x 170 cm 
€ 13 000 

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Disappering Into the Past #35, 2010 - 2012

Archival Fiber Print

50 x 51 cm

Edition of 100

SEK 6,000

Love Lundell

Love Lundell 

Plan Escape, 2016

Acrylic and collage on MDF

120 x 161.8 cm

SEK 55,000

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman, Narcissus XII, 2019

FLOWERS IN ART HISTORY 

There are countless flowers that fill their own chapters in art history. Claude Monet’s famous water lily pond with weeping willows reflected in the water in his Giverny garden. Vincent van Gogh’s smouldering sunflowers and his somewhat lesser-known yellow irises, blossoming almond trees and oleanders. Georgia O’Keefe’s sensual floral creations, unmoored from their natural habitat, like a boat drifting from its berth... The list is endless. Innocent flowers can thrive on the minefield of art. Emil Nolde’s paintings were once classified as “degenerate art”. His watercolors of flowers, created in solitude during the war years in Sebüll, were dubbed “unpainted pictures”, as though they had never existed.

Flowers have figured in art since time immemorial. They were particularly favoured in the still-life tradition, which flourished in the 17th century. The still life was the most specialised genre in Dutch painting. Compositions of beautiful plates, jugs, wine glasses and precious porcelain bowls reminded viewers of the sumptuous pleasures of dining and looked good in wealthy homes. In those days, a tulip bulb could cost as much as a diamond. The fervour with which flowers were immortalised on canvas was simply a logical consequence. Flower-painting, in all its symbolically-charged complexity, could also signify status. That sort of art therefore practically sold itself. But still-life painting was also an experimental field for artists. It gave them opportunities to study reflections and refractions in full and empty glasses, to try their skills in depicting a clear drop of water on a petal, and to develop their color palette.

Flower 2

Robert Mapplethorpe, Tulips, 1987

17th-century still lifes almost always contain some symbol of life’s transience, often cleverly hidden, as a cautionary memento mori – a reminder of our own mortality. Vanitas vanitatum – Vanity of vanities, all is vanity. Those words in Latin from Ecclesiastes 1,2 in the Old Testament provided the name for a particularly subtle subcategory: the vanitas still life, where death and transience were the overall theme, with details such as skulls, bones, an extinguished candle, a broken blade of grass, a musical instrument, a bubble, or – yes – a wilted flower. Flowers were an obvious choice in this context. In their prime, they represent life itself. But life is short. And thus, the blossom also warns us of life’s fragility. Beauty is fleeting, soon all that remains is darkness. That a drooping flower is more symbolically poignant than one that is already beyond hope is easy to explain. The greatest threat is always that which might happen, not the inevitable. If it is already over, then we have nothing to lose. The worst agony arises when we are about to lose what we hold dear.

Text by Joanna Persman for Marjolein Rothman's exhibition False Color, 2019. Read the entire text HERE

Photography 1

Nathalia Edenmont
Dazzling, 2017
 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

The road which lead up to photography, is believed to be very heavily influenced by landscape artists. As the movements for landscape paintings went from classical landscapes to romantic landscape and onwards to capture reality, photography is driven by the same notion – to capture a fleeting moment in time as precise as possible. However, it was quite a long process for the invention of photography, originally driven by scientists, to achieve the status of fine art.

The first imaging device is called camera obscura and can be traced back to antiquity. The camera did not actually record images, only projected objects upside down onto another surface. The technique was used by artists such as Da Vinci and Caravaggio to capture light and shadows in a more accurate way. Camera Obscura uses the same technique as a pinhole camera and the first record of an image that did not fade quickly through a camera dates back to the 1830’s. From there, it led to daguerreotypes to calotypes onwards to the foundation of Kodak in 1880 who revolutionized the photographic development and made cameras accessible, not only to professional and what we today know as disposable cameras. 

Photography 2

Astrid Kruse Jensen 
Disappearing Into The Past #23, 2010-2012

During the world wars, 35mm film and polaroid’s saw the light of day and in the 1950’s changeable lenses and other accessories was introduced. The first digital camera was introduced 1991, and before that different type of automatic cameras came to the market and made photography even more accessible for the public. In the year 2000 photography changed forever, when everyone could have a camera in their pocket via their phone.

Generally speaking, analog photograpghy uses pshysical, non-electronic recoding medium such as a photographic film or a plate, where light is captured by sensitive silver particles and the image will reamind printed when processed chemically. The process or photography are much alike photosynthesis, not only by name, but that the process's can't work without light. 

For more detailed information about analogue techniques, we recommend this article from Artsy! 

 

 

WG.Summer 2020

Photosynthesis

Thumb-Show Thumbnails
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Das Leben im Bahnen / Live on tracks (in circles), 2019

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 50 cm

€ 12,000

Inquire
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Infinity, 2010

C-print mounted to Glass

80 x 91 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 80,000

Inquire
Dina Isæus-Berlin

Dina Isæus-Berlin 

Untitled, 2018

Oil On Linen

73 x 70 cm

SEK 22,000

Inquire
Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Cloud V, 2018

Oil On Aluminum

180 x 130 cm

€ 10,600 

Inquire
Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Film Edge (Pink Sky, Yellow And Black Horizon), 2011

Mixed Media Oil On Canvas

28 x 28 Inches

$ 30,000

Inquire
Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Floating #16, 2017

Archival Fiber Print

135 x 140 cm

Edition of 2

€ 10,000

Inquire
Ylva Ceder

Ylva Ceder

Ängd, 2019

Mixed media, Oil on Panel

190 x 200 cm

SEK 185,000

Inquire
Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Disappearing Into The Past #46, 2010-12

Archival Fiber Print

80 x 82 cm

Edition of 5

€ 4,700

Inquire
Ylva Ceder

Ylva Ceder

Moras, 2019

Mixed media, Oil on Panel

190 x 200 cm

SEK 185,000

Inquire
Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus II (The Lotus Series), 2008

Pigmented Ink-jet With Photogravure On Somerset Velvet

117 x 152 x 4.45 cm

Edition of 50

$ 18,000

Inquire
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Elegance, 2018

C-print mounted onto aluminium behind glass in a black wooden frame

160 x 165 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 185,000

Inquire
Love Lundell

Love Lundell (b. 1981)

Cabana Mañana, 2019

Paper collage

71 x 91.5 cm

SEK 45,000

Inquire
Mike and Doug Starn

Mike and Doug Starn

Attracted to Light 13, 2002

Toned Silver Print On Thai Mulberry Paper

26 x 26 inches

Edition of 10 

$ 12,000

Inquire
Love Lundell

Love Lundell 

Dying on the Vine, 2019

Paper collage

71.50 x 92 cm

SEK 45,000

Inquire
Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Sun, 2007

C-type Print Mounted On Glass In An Aluminum Frame

57 x 44 cm 

Edition of 6

SEK 75,000

Inquire
SEO

SEO

Das Leben im Bahnen / Live on tracks (in circles), 2019

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 50 cm

€ 12,000

Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Infinity, 2010

C-print mounted to Glass

80 x 91 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 80,000

Dina Isæus-Berlin

Dina Isæus-Berlin 

Untitled, 2018

Oil On Linen

73 x 70 cm

SEK 22,000

Marjolein Rothman

Marjolein Rothman

Cloud V, 2018

Oil On Aluminum

180 x 130 cm

€ 10,600 

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Film Edge (Pink Sky, Yellow And Black Horizon), 2011

Mixed Media Oil On Canvas

28 x 28 Inches

$ 30,000

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Floating #16, 2017

Archival Fiber Print

135 x 140 cm

Edition of 2

€ 10,000

Ylva Ceder

Ylva Ceder

Ängd, 2019

Mixed media, Oil on Panel

190 x 200 cm

SEK 185,000

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Astrid Kruse Jensen

Disappearing Into The Past #46, 2010-12

Archival Fiber Print

80 x 82 cm

Edition of 5

€ 4,700

Ylva Ceder

Ylva Ceder

Moras, 2019

Mixed media, Oil on Panel

190 x 200 cm

SEK 185,000

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus II (The Lotus Series), 2008

Pigmented Ink-jet With Photogravure On Somerset Velvet

117 x 152 x 4.45 cm

Edition of 50

$ 18,000

Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Elegance, 2018

C-print mounted onto aluminium behind glass in a black wooden frame

160 x 165 cm

Edition of 6

SEK 185,000

Love Lundell

Love Lundell (b. 1981)

Cabana Mañana, 2019

Paper collage

71 x 91.5 cm

SEK 45,000

Mike and Doug Starn

Mike and Doug Starn

Attracted to Light 13, 2002

Toned Silver Print On Thai Mulberry Paper

26 x 26 inches

Edition of 10 

$ 12,000

Love Lundell

Love Lundell 

Dying on the Vine, 2019

Paper collage

71.50 x 92 cm

SEK 45,000

Nathalia Edenmont

Nathalia Edenmont

Sun, 2007

C-type Print Mounted On Glass In An Aluminum Frame

57 x 44 cm 

Edition of 6

SEK 75,000

WG.Summer 2020

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis at Work, led by David Attenborough, aired on BBC Two, 2011